Jul 25, 2011

Stuff you might have missed -- Rman's skipwaves

 Huge Bomb explo kills 76 in Norway, injures many

Oslo, Norway (CNN) -- The suspect in the deadliest attack in Norway since World War II has acknowledged carrying out the mass shooting and bombing, and claims to have worked with two other cells, a judge said Monday.
Judge Kim Heger said that the suspect, Anders Behring Breivik, acknowledges carrying out the attacks, but said the attacks were necessary to prevent the "colonization" of the country by Muslims. He accused the Labour Party, whose members were targets of the mass shooting, of "treason" for promoting multiculturalism, the judge said.
Police refused to release information about their investigation into the possibility that two cells aided Breivik, saying Monday that a court hearing was closed so as not to disclose information.
Who is Anders Behring Breivik?
Other court officials have said they could not confirm the existence of the cells and referred questions to police.
Norway police decrease confirmed dead
Breivik's digital footprint
Norwegian suspect will remain in custody
Gallery: Dual attacks in Norway
During his court hearing Monday, Breivik appeared "very calm," an official said. "He was very concise in trying to explain why he was trying to do this," the official said. "But when he started reading from his manifest, he was stopped."
Two court psychiatrists will be assigned to the case, he added.
Heger ordered Breivik to remain in custody for eight weeks, until his next scheduled court appearance, as authorities continue to investigate a bombing in Oslo and a mass shooting at a nearby island that together killed at least 76 people.
Authorities originally said 93 had died but announced Monday that eight people were confirmed dead in the bombing and 68 in the shooting. Also on Monday, police said they were still searching Utoya Island for shooting victims, adding that 50 officers were going through "to make sure there are no casualties left."

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Gay's in the military.  NOW.
The Pentagon is set to certify that the U.S. military is prepared to accept openly gay and lesbian service members, and that doing so will not harm military readiness.
According to the official, who spoke on condition of not being identified, an announcement of that certification -- which is required to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy -- is likely to come Friday.

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ABC says this heat wave will last for WEEKS!!!  22 dead so far!   Ewwwwwww.  More...

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CHICAGO (CBS) — City crews scrambling to turn off nearly 2,000 fire hydrants opened by residents seeking relief from the heat required a police escort to protect them from gang members and others upset with the shutdowns.
CBS 2 found one city crew being followed by a police sport-utility vehicle as they crisscrossed neighborhoods, turning off a total of 1,921 hydrants.
“It’s a waste of water, and I have to do my job,” said 20-year Water Management Department veteran Richard Quarles.



A U.S. drone was shot down while flying over a nuclear facility in Iran, according to reports in the Iranian media.

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News Corporation head Rupert Murdoch arrives at his Fifth Avenue residence, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, in New York. Emerging relatively unscathed from a British parliamentary hearing on the phone hacking scandal, Rupert Murdoch returned to the United States on Wednesday, where his company faces a host of financial and legal challenges. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)In The Dark? Murdoch's History Shows He's "A Hands-On" Owner
News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has denied knowing about alleged misconduct by employees. But senior staff who worked for Murdoch have said that he's been a "hands-on" owner who has been closely involved with his media properties.

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    Blackberry maker to cut 2,000 jobs, splits COO job
    Jul. 25, 2011 10:57 AM ET

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Faced with tough competition and falling profits, BlackBerry maker Research In Motion Ltd. is cutting 2,000 jobs as part of a cost savings plan announced last month and is shuffling some senior executives....




The U.S. Justice Department is preparing subpoenas as part of preliminary investigations into News Corp. relating to alleged foreign bribery and alleged hacking of voicemail of Sept. 11 victims, according to a government official.   The issuance of such subpoenas, which would broadly seek relevant information from the company, requires approval by senior Justice Department leadership, which hasn't yet happened, the person said

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Hiring Immigrants ban in Springfield
The Springfield MO Minutemen chapter submittted signatures for an initiative petition that would force local businesses to dig deeper to verify the immigration status of employees.  The organization needs about 2,100 valid signatures of registered voters in the city; it says it submitted 2,400 to the city clerk's office.  The city clerk still has to verify the signatures on the petitions.

Under the initiative petition, businesses would be forced to check the immigration status of employees using the federal E-verify database.  Currently, Missouri law already requires all entities doing business with the state to use the system.

"It has nothing to do with racism, it has to do with the law of the land," said Wilson.  "We support legal immigrants. Our country was founded on legal immigration and built by immigrants.

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Why the Wealthiest Americans Are the Real 'Job-Killers'
The top 1 percent takes in more than twice the share of national income today than they did 30 years ago, and that's a big reason why consumers are tapped out.

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 To Die in Mexico: Dispatches from a Deadly Drug War
Author John Gibler's new book surveys surveys the unending flow of drugs north and guns and cash south and the tens of thousands of murders they cause.

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The end of the space shuttle marks a retreat in America's ambitions

Atlantis lands at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral (Photo: Reuters)
Atlantis lands at the Kennedy Space Center (Photo: Reuters)

Maybe because my parents got me out of bed to watch Neil Armstrong step onto the Moon on a rented television, or because I grew up in the US where the space programme was a prominent backdrop to any childhood, but I’ve been gripped by the Nasa feed of the last space shuttle returning to earth.

Somewhere in my crates of useless stuff is a photograph of me and two school friends standing in front of the space shuttle Columbia at Cape Canaveral a few days before it launched in April 1981. We were 16, and our parents had handed us a bit of cash and let us jump on a Greyhound bus for the 24-hour ride to Florida to spend a few days in Titusville and wait for the launch. From memory it was delayed so we stayed on in the hope that it might go ahead before our absence from school was noticed. On April 12, along with thousands of others, we stood on the shore of the Banana river and watched it rocket into the sky, the sight and sound nailing us to the spot.

At one level, it is easy to wonder quite why $180 billion has been spent on keeping an out-of-date white elephant in the air. But a few weeks ago when Prof Brian Cox gave a show-stopper of a lecture at Hay in which he included a picture of the distant speck of Earth taken by Voyager from the edge of the solar system, I was reminded of the irresistible attraction of this greatest of human adventures.

The moment the wheels of Atlantis touched the ground earlier, it ended and our ambitions suddenly look earth-bound. It’s also a moment freighted with symbolism for America and its sense of self.

You don’t have to read The Right Stuff to know that the manned space flight programme was a way for the US to assert its confidence and demonstrate its will to do anything required to be number one. In those days it was about beating the Soviets, and so those pressures don’t exist now in the same way. But with the idea of American exceptionalism under review and the US losing its mojo, we should not underestimate the capacity for this moment to be a blow to American morale.

-0-



A psychiatrist was conducting a group therapy session with four young mothers and their small  children. "You all have obsessions," he  observed.
 
To the first mother,  Mary, he said, "You are obsessed with eating.  You've even named your daughter Candy."

He turned to the  second Mom, Ann, "Your obsession is with money. Again, it manifests itself in your child's name,  Penny."

He turned to the third  Mom, Joyce, "Your obsession is alcohol. This too shows itself  in your child's name, Brandy."
 
At this point, the fourth mother, Kathy, quietly got up, took her little boy by the hand, and whispered,  "Come on, Dick, this guy has no idea what he is talking about.  Let's pick up Peter and Willy from school and go get some dinner."
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Gay's in the military.  NOW.
The Pentagon is set to certify that the U.S. military is prepared to accept openly gay and lesbian service members, and that doing so will not harm military readiness.
According to the official, who spoke on condition of not being identified, an announcement of that certification -- which is required to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy -- .

-0-


ABC says this heat wave will last for WEEKS!!!  22 dead so far!   Ewwwwwww.  More...

-0-


CHICAGO (CBS) — City crews scrambling to turn off nearly 2,000 fire hydrants opened by residents seeking relief from the heat required a police escort to protect them from gang members and others upset with the shutdowns.
CBS 2 found one city crew being followed by a police sport-utility vehicle as they crisscrossed neighborhoods, turning off a total of 1,921 hydrants.
“It’s a waste of water, and I have to do my job,” said 20-year Water Management Department veteran Richard Quarles.



A U.S. drone was shot down while flying over a nuclear facility in Iran, according to reports in the Iranian media.

-0-



News Corporation head Rupert Murdoch arrives at his Fifth Avenue residence, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, in New York. Emerging relatively unscathed from a British parliamentary hearing on the phone hacking scandal, Rupert Murdoch returned to the United States on Wednesday, where his company faces a host of financial and legal challenges. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)In The Dark? Murdoch's History Shows He's "A Hands-On" Owner
News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has denied knowing about alleged misconduct by employees. But senior staff who worked for Murdoch have said that he's been a "hands-on" owner who has been closely involved with his media properties.

-0-






    Blackberry maker to cut 2,000 jobs, splits COO job
    Jul. 25, 2011 10:57 AM ET

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Faced with tough competition and falling profits, BlackBerry maker Research In Motion Ltd. is cutting 2,000 jobs as part of a cost savings plan announced last month and is shuffling some senior executives....




The U.S. Justice Department is preparing subpoenas as part of preliminary investigations into News Corp. relating to alleged foreign bribery and alleged hacking of voicemail of Sept. 11 victims, according to a government official.   The issuance of such subpoenas, which would broadly seek relevant information from the company, requires approval by senior Justice Department leadership, which hasn't yet happened, the person said

-0-

Hiring Immigrants ban in Springfield
The Springfield MO Minutemen chapter submittted signatures for an initiative petition that would force local businesses to dig deeper to verify the immigration status of employees.  The organization needs about 2,100 valid signatures of registered voters in the city; it says it submitted 2,400 to the city clerk's office.  The city clerk still has to verify the signatures on the petitions.

Under the initiative petition, businesses would be forced to check the immigration status of employees using the federal E-verify database.  Currently, Missouri law already requires all entities doing business with the state to use the system.

"It has nothing to do with racism, it has to do with the law of the land," said Wilson.  "We support legal immigrants. Our country was founded on legal immigration and built by immigrants.

-0-

Why the Wealthiest Americans Are the Real 'Job-Killers'
The top 1 percent takes in more than twice the share of national income today than they did 30 years ago, and that's a big reason why consumers are tapped out.

-0-

 To Die in Mexico: Dispatches from a Deadly Drug War
Author John Gibler's new book surveys surveys the unending flow of drugs north and guns and cash south and the tens of thousands of murders they cause.

-0-

The end of the space shuttle marks a retreat in America's ambitions

Atlantis lands at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral (Photo: Reuters)
Atlantis lands at the Kennedy Space Center (Photo: Reuters)

Maybe because my parents got me out of bed to watch Neil Armstrong step onto the Moon on a rented television, or because I grew up in the US where the space programme was a prominent backdrop to any childhood, but I’ve been gripped by the Nasa feed of the last space shuttle returning to earth.

Somewhere in my crates of useless stuff is a photograph of me and two school friends standing in front of the space shuttle Columbia at Cape Canaveral a few days before it launched in April 1981. We were 16, and our parents had handed us a bit of cash and let us jump on a Greyhound bus for the 24-hour ride to Florida to spend a few days in Titusville and wait for the launch. From memory it was delayed so we stayed on in the hope that it might go ahead before our absence from school was noticed. On April 12, along with thousands of others, we stood on the shore of the Banana river and watched it rocket into the sky, the sight and sound nailing us to the spot.

At one level, it is easy to wonder quite why $180 billion has been spent on keeping an out-of-date white elephant in the air. But a few weeks ago when Prof Brian Cox gave a show-stopper of a lecture at Hay in which he included a picture of the distant speck of Earth taken by Voyager from the edge of the solar system, I was reminded of the irresistible attraction of this greatest of human adventures.

The moment the wheels of Atlantis touched the ground earlier, it ended and our ambitions suddenly look earth-bound. It’s also a moment freighted with symbolism for America and its sense of self.

You don’t have to read The Right Stuff to know that the manned space flight programme was a way for the US to assert its confidence and demonstrate its will to do anything required to be number one. In those days it was about beating the Soviets, and so those pressures don’t exist now in the same way. But with the idea of American exceptionalism under review and the US losing its mojo, we should not underestimate the capacity for this moment to be a blow to American morale.

-0-



A psychiatrist was conducting a group therapy session with four young mothers and their small  children. "You all have obsessions," he  observed.
 
To the first mother,  Mary, he said, "You are obsessed with eating.  You've even named your daughter Candy."

He turned to the  second Mom, Ann, "Your obsession is with money. Again, it manifests itself in your child's name,  Penny."

He turned to the third  Mom, Joyce, "Your obsession is alcohol. This too shows itself  in your child's name, Brandy."
 
At this point, the fourth mother, Kathy, quietly got up, took her little boy by the hand, and whispered,  "Come on, Dick, this guy has no idea what he is talking about.  Let's pick up Peter and Willy from school and go get some dinner."
-0-

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