Jun 22, 2011

Taliban Waits us Out! (Shades of Vietnam) Plus Stuff you might have missed - skipwaves 6/22

Illustration: Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Taliban waits out Obama

President Obama is expected to announce tonight the first phase of withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan, making good on his self-imposed July 2011 deadline. The White House will contend that this is being done from a position of strength, but the Taliban will spin it as an ignominious U.S. retreat.  (No friend of the Presidents... the Washington Times tells it like it is.)

 -0-

Predicting the River Flooding in Parkville: Voodoo Science 
That's how a police spokesman described predicting when the Missouri will flood over its banks.  Parkville, with help from volunteers and city people, is ready except for last minute sandbagging on Main Street to complete a big levee.  Otherwise they wait.  Said a police Major, when levees fail upstream, it delays when Parkville will get its measure of water, but won't really change the water level when all is said and done.

More on upstream flooding and the problems the Corps of Engineers has pleasing everyone...on radioman's skipwaves.


-0-

The guy the GOP hates: Olberman back on the air

It was swell watching Keith debut this week on Currents channel .. even tho I missed the first six minutes of him just finding out where Currents was on my Time Warner Channel lineup.  (226 in Kansas City.)   I've missed him from MSNBC's lineup.  The only problem was that after watching him, I missed half of Rachel Maddow... which completely threw me off for my evening anticipating thunderstorms.  EGOLINK: Wash Post review (Post is a FoxFamily publication)  of the First of Keith... who seems to be rebroadcast every hour on Al Gore's new TV channel.  Hopefully, Current's not TV's version of the defunct Air America.   Even so, I'd follow Keith anywhere.  Just don't be gone so long again!



 -0- 

 Gallup:  Only 45 percent of Americans get their heath care from their employers!  And 1 in 7 has no insurance at all!  More from Gallup...

-0- 

 

 Arizona Sheriff Paul Babeu said the US decision to extend the deployment of 1,200 U.S. National Guard troops along the U.S. border with Mexico until Sept. 30 is “pandering” and that those numbers “fall far short” of what military power is needed to keep the country safe.  Babeu noted, for comparison, the 28,500 U.S. troops stationed in South Korea to help defend it against North Korean aggression; U.S. troops have been stationed in South Korea for 58 years.  More on this story...

-0-

Texas delegation pushes Gov. Rick Perry to run for president

 Perry (R) is being encouraged to enter the presidential race by the members of the Texas delegation he’s consulted about a White House bid.  Members of the delegation are openly advocating for Perry, who’s reconsidering his earlier decision to stay out of the 2012 White House campaign.

-0-

Airport NO GROPING bill  back in Texas
Gov. Rick Perry announced he had added legislation that would make it illegal for TSA agents to engage in “intrusive touching” at airports security checkpoints without probable cause to the list of items for the legislature to consider during the special session.

The measure had previously failed to muster enough support in the Texas Senate to come up for a vote because the Justice Department wrote a scathing memo against the bill, which threatened legal action against the state, and the measure became enmeshed in Senate politics.

There are questions about what impact the legislation might have since airport security is a federal matter.


-0-


-0-


Don't Expect to See Gasoline Below $3 Any Time Soon

-0-



-0-

NBC: Sorry for Cutting 'Under God'

NBC quickly offered an on-air apology Sunday for omitting “a portion” of the Pledge of Allegiance during its U.S. Open coverage. The network edited out the words "under God" twice from montages of Pledge readings that were shown on TV. Twitter exploded with negative comments, with some tweets calling for a boycott of the network. NBC commentator Dan Hicks read a statement shortly thereafter: "It was not done to upset anyone, and we'd like to apologize to those of you who were offended by it."

-0-

Airbus racks up orders, glitches at Paris Air Show (AP)
A Korean Air Lines Airbus A380 performs its demonstration flight, on the first day of the Paris air show at le Bourget airport, east of Paris, Monday June 20, 2011. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)AP - Airbus and Boeing signed over $25 billion in orders to kick off the Paris Air Show on Monday, but the European jet maker's appearance at the industry's biggest annual event suffered a setback when its star superjumbo clipped a wing.


-0-

I called my stockbroker and asked him what I should be buying ...    
 
He said, "If the Republicans take over in 2012,  canned goods and ammunition would be best."


-0-

Man pisses in a Portland lake.  City Drains it!
Because a 21-year-old man was caught on a security camera urinating into a city reservoir, Oregon's biggest city is sending 8 million gallons of treated drinking water down the drain.
Portland officials defended the decision Monday, saying they didn't want to send city residents water laced, however infinitesimally, with urine.   Overreacting?  More from the AP


-0-
Time to get a new pilot?
A quadriplegic man from Fort Collins was forced off a Frontier Airlines plane because a pilot said it wasn't safe for him to fly.

His mother, Kathleen Morris, said there was no problem two days earlier when her son flew Frontier from Denver International Airport to Dallas to attend a family wedding.But Sunday afternoon, when he boarded in Dallas to come home, John Morris and his family said they were humiliated.
"When a flight attendant saw John strapped in, they said they would have to clear it with the captain," said Kathleen Morris.She said that her son is a quadriplegic with limited upper body control.Morris has flown Frontier Airlines in the past, using an airline seat-belt extension to secure his chest and legs to the seat.

The extension is normally used by larger passengers who need a longer seat belt to secure their waist."But this time, the pilot refused to take off," she said. "So, I said that we wouldn't get off the plane until they figured it out."

Fellow passenger Denny Cannon was seated nearby and overheard that Frontier couldn't use its equipment for medical purposes.So, he and other upset passengers, offered to help."Me and other passengers said, 'Well, sure, use our belts and we'll somehow restrain him and then you won't be using Frontier products," Cannon recalled.But in the end, to the dismay of other passengers,


Frontier called airport police. Three police officers boarded the plane.The officers told the pilot this was not a law enforcement matter."It looks like he's safely restrained," an officer said, according to Kathleen Morris. "This is not an issue for us, because he's not posing a problem for the plane or other passengers."The captain again refused to take off with Morris onboard."He cannot fly. I want him off this plane," the pilot said, according to Kathleen Morris."It was humiliating," the mother said. "The officers kept apologizing to me and to John and kept saying, 'This is wrong.'"

A snowboarding accident five years ago left John Morris paralyzed. The 24-year-old Colorado State University student said he couldn't believe how he was treated on the plane, and he was sorry for the delay the incident caused."I felt horrible," he said. "I just felt like I didn't belong. I haven't felt that bad since the accident.""It really broke my heart, because I know what John goes through on a day to day basis, not being able to do things that he certainly would like to, just wanting the opportunity to travel," Kathleen Morris said.

Other passengers wondered why Frontier didn't have policies established for accommodating people with disabilities."It was very demoralizing and dehumanizing. It should have been dealt with at the gate, not after he was already boarded," said one passenger.Frontier spokesman Peter Kowalchuk said the pilot was concerned for the safety of Morris and uncertain whether the seat-belt extension could be used to restrain his legs and torso.

The captain has the ultimate decision on issues regarding passenger safety on a plane, he said.However, Frontier arranged for the Morris family to take the next flight, and the pilot on that plane had no issues with transporting the disabled man."So, one pilot thought that it would not be safe. And another pilot … apparently thought it would not be a threat to anybody's safety," Kowalchuk said.

He said that Federal Aviation Administration and Frontier regulations are unclear on whether the seat-belt extension can be used to restrain a disabled passenger."It will require clarity moving forward," he added.When a passenger has to leave a flight, an incident report is issued, Kowalchuck said."I'm sure that this (incident report) will be reviewed, and I'm sure that there will be consideration given to how this was handled," the spokesman said.Steve Cowell, an aviation safety consultant, told 7NEWS the pilot should have called airline managers for advice on handling the issue."It was completely inappropriate of this captain to escalate ... the situation to the level that he did by calling the police," Cowell said. "It really tells me that this captain did not know how to utilize all the resources available to him."

The Morris family told 7NEWS on Sunday night, when they arrived from Dallas, that they are now planning legal action.According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, these are the guidelines concerning disabled passengers:
    The Department’s disability regulation allows carriers to refuse to provide transportation to any passenger on the basis of safety, as provided in 49 U.S.C. 44902 or 14 CFR 121.533, or to any passenger whose carriage would violate FAA or TSA requirements. See section 382.19 (a). 49 U.S.C 44902 (b) states that carriers may refuse to transport a passenger or property the carrier decides is, or might be, inimical to safety. Additionally, 14 CFR 121.533 (d) states that each pilot in command of an aircraft is, during flight time, in command of the aircraft and crew and is responsible for the safety of the passengers, crew members, cargo, and airplane. Taken together, this means that a carrier has the legal authority to refuse to transport an individual on the basis of safety.However, this does not mean that an airline, including the pilot or other airline staff, can discriminate on the basis of disability. If the Department finds that an airline’s decision to refuse to transport an individual with a disability was not related to safety, then it will take action against the carrier. The Department will also review the airline’s actions to see if the carrier followed the required process/procedures by providing the person who was refused transportation a written statement of the reason for the refusal within 10 days.

-0-

Radioman's favorite TKC comment of today was on the problem with so many KC murders:

-0-


Never Turn Down the President
For his 73rd round of golf as president Saturday, Barack Obama invited House Speaker John A. Boehner to join him on the greens. 
The top Democrat teamed up with the most powerful Republican for 18 holes against Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican. There's something unseemly about a commander in chief going on this jaunt while troops are in harm's way and the self-imposed July 1 deadline for a deal on spending cuts and the debt ceiling looms. "Boehner has always said that if you're invited to anything by the president, you should go," the speaker's spokesman, Michael Steel, told The Washington Times.




-0-

No comments: